LinkedIn is not a dating site

If you’re checking out profiles on LinkedIn looking for your next date, you have a pretty fundamental misunderstanding of what the site is for (and why the people you’re checking out have profiles there).

This might seem like something that should go without saying, but I recently did an interview with the New York Post about a new dating app that syncs to the user’s LinkedIn account. From there, you filter by gender, age, distance, industry, and school, and it’ll show you other LinkedIn users’ headshots, professions, hometowns, and alma maters so that you can decide who you want to hit up for a date.

This is a terrible and gross idea.

LinkedIn in a professional networking site; it’s not a social site. It’s to help you manage your professional contacts and your career.

And most people on LinkedIn — and at work — want to be judged first as professionals. People don’t generally want colleagues assessing their attractiveness or sizing them up as a potential date. Most people want colleagues to be thinking about their competence, not whether they might want to make out with you.

Plus, while it’s certainly true that many people find romance at work or among work contacts, that doesn’t mean that you should actively try to cultivate it there. It’s one thing if an attraction develops naturally with someone you know you in a professional context, but actively seeking out romance in your professional network — without even having anyone particular in mind — is courting problems. Dating within your professional circles can be messy. It can impact your work relationships, cause tensions when things don’t work out, and impact the way you’re perceived, fairly or unfairly.

Please keep your dating game, your flirtatious eye contact, and your Axe body spray off of LinkedIn.

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